ODH is a unique opportunity to meet like-minded artists and technology specialists who are interested in creative risk-taking and collaborate in an easy-going and supportive atmosphere. Together we explore the relationship between dance and technology to kickstart the future of performance.

Due to Corona restrictions, ODH22 was reduced in scale to feature mainly Finland-based artists. We are hoping to revisit ODH22 in the Autumn to get to work with some of the artists who couldn’t participate in February.

The ODH22 Demo was broadcast live on Friday 11th February

Yunjia Liu is a freelance guitarist, composer, singer, and producer. She was born in China and has lived in Finland since 2020. Yunjia Liu’s music is deeply influenced by the philosophical ideas such as Minimalism, Taoism, Yin-Yang and the inspirations of Nature.

Matti Haaponiemi is a dance artist from Tampere, who’s work is based around improvisation, interaction and contact improvisation, diy electronics and modular synthesis.

Sonjis Laine is a Helsinki-based artist and an anthropologist who works with the themes of care, empathy, cyber spaces as expanded environments and technological devices as co-performers.

Stephanie Felber is an award-winning choreographer, performer, photographer and video artist based in Munich, Germany. Stephanie’s focus lies particularly in new media, audience engagement, the intersection between performance and society, innovative models of collaboration and the creation of new dramaturgies. Stephanie will be joining the Hack online from her studio in Munich.

Tomek Stachowiak is a programmer with a background in theoretical physics and maths. Over the years, his work included many subjects, including medical science, games and radio technology and human/machine communication.

Milla Toppi is a contemporary dancer and choreographer based in Oulu. Inspired by visual arts, Milla’s chosen artistic path leads through the absurd, the uncanny and the surreal.


When TaikaBox moved from Cardiff, Wales to Oulu, Finland in 2015, we had a dream to set up a dance/tech studio where artists could experiment with the relationship between movement and technology. We’re still on that journey to having a permanent studio, and in the meantime, have found ways to work with artists from all round the world, introducing them to our methods of cross-media collaboration.

In 2016, we launched Oulu Dance Hack with a 3-day intensive hosted by EduLAB and the Dance Department at Oulu University of Applied Sciences (OAMK). 12 artists were selected from an open call process, and travelled to Oulu in August, spending the time with TaikaBox and a small selection of dance and media students.

We invited local tech businesses to come on board and gave the artists opportunities to work with a robot arm and multifunction sensors as well as the TaikaBox toolkit and the EVE environment at OAMK.

After a day of introductions and experiments with various sensors, the artists split into groups and headed off to their respective studios to get hacking. With support from TaikaBox and some peer sharing sessions, they created short dance works that were shared at the end of the project, inviting an audience to tour the studios to see what had been created.

video made by Jussi Liikala

The structure of the project was repeated in 2017, with a different robot arm, a drone, IR camera/floor projection and the addition of two local musicians to support the visiting artists.

video made by media students from OAMK

In 2018, the Hack was again extended by a day and the artists had access to a 360 camera, 3D tracking with multiple kinects and floor projection, and MYO movement sensors triggering a sound/projection environment. After the sharing at OAMK, we moved into Oulu Museum of Art and showed the work there in the evening.

That was the year we started collaborating with Studio Siilo at Kulttuurivoimala. They run a media workshop that works with young people who have been out of work for a long time, teaching them how to make films and documentaries. They sent a camera crew into the studios throughout the Hack to document the process. We also added morning classes to the programme.

In 2019 we shifted the Hack week to later in the year and integrated it into LUMO – Oulu Light Festival. This meant that we were unable to use the studios at OAMK, so started the week in City Dance and then moved up to Oulu Museum of Art. To connect with the LUMO festival, we incorporated streetlights, flexible LED strips and moving head lights into the project, setting up a programme of performances that was seen by hundreds of visitors over the festival weekend. The collaboration with LUMO, plus funding from the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation enabled us to bring in more mentors and cover the visiting artists’ travel and accommodation costs.

Due to Coronavirus restrictions, 2020’s Oulu Dance Hack was canceled and the situation impacted the 2021 Hack – but in a good way. In Autumn 2020 we were able to rent a studio in Pikisaari for 8 months and set it up with camera, computer and speedy internet to be able to connect with studios elsewhere. (the story of our Connected Studio System is here)

We worked with the system during the Moving Barents – Out of Urgency project, but felt that it would benefit from some deeper research into the nature of connecting two studios, so ODH21 was a collaboration between us and Central Europe Dance Theatre in Budapest. Because of Corona regulations, we could only invite three independent artists into our studio to work with three dancers from CEDT on stage in Bethlen Theatre. The results were fascinating and the project has paved the way for future collaborations.

The City of Oulu will become the European Capital of Culture in 2026. Oulu Dance Hack is part of the Cool Contrasts project. Over the next few years we will begin to connect with other European cities, running a programme of Hacks with likeminded organisations and commissioning a series of works to form the basis of Finland’s first Festival of Augmented Dance in 2026.



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